Social Security & Assisted Living: SSI, OSS and How It All Works

 

Introduction


If you arrived on this webpage, you likely have questions about Social Security’s benefits for assisted living. You are wondering if Social Security pays for assisted living or if there exists a little-known, secret benefit that can help. You might be confused about the relationship between Supplemental Security Income, Optional State Supplements, Medicaid, nursing homes, and non-medical, residential care. You are likely bewildered by a swarm of acronyms like RCFE, SSI, OSS and NMOHC. Don’t worry, this article will sort it all out for you.

 The short answer is yes, in most states, Social Security (through Optional State Supplements) provides financial assistance for persons that reside in assisted living communities provided they meet the eligibility criteria. 

 

Definitions & Acronyms

To help in understanding, it is best to provide some definitions and clear up any misperceptions.

  • Social Security – provides retirement income for seniors that have paid into the program, which includes almost everyone that has worked legally in the US. More.
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI) – is financial help for persons with limited income and assets. SSI evaluates one's income and fills in the gap to bring their income up to a pre-set amount. More.
  • Optional State Supplements (OSS) – are state-based financial help provided on top of the federal SSI benefit. OSS benefit amounts differ for each recipient and may vary depending on where they live (i.e. at home or in assisted living). It is under OSS where Social Security provides financial help for assisted living. OSS are also called State Supplementary Payments (SSP).
  • Assisted Living - non-medical care, meals, and activities are provided in a group living environment. A staggering number of acronyms are used to essentially describe what is the same thing across the 50 states. A non-exhaustive list follows:

AFC – Adult Foster Care or Adult Family Care
ARCH - Adult Residential Care Homes
CBRF – Community Based Residential Facilities
CCFFH - Community Care Foster Family Homes
CRCF - Community Residential Care Facilities
NMOHC – Non-Medical Out of Home Care
OPNMI - Other Private Non-Medical Institution
RCAC - Residential Care Apartment Complex
RCF - Residential Care Facilities
RCFE – Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly
SCU - Special Care Unit

 

How It Works (READ THIS FIRST!)

 Read this section before going to your state’s policy. 

Optional State Social Security Supplements are complicated and confusing. However, families caring for an aging loved one, need not understand every nuance. In a simplified view, there are two models of assistance by which states help low-income elderly persons afford assisted living or adult foster care.

1) Providing Money for Assisted Living Room & Board Costs
For persons who are financially eligible, states, through their Optional State Supplements, provide assistance to help pay for the room and board fees associated with assisted living or adult foster care. The benefit is provided as additional money over and above the amount they receive from Social Security SSI. However, the individual does not receive the money directly. Instead, it goes directly to their assisted living community or adult foster care home. Depending on one’s state, the amount of assistance can range from insignificant, just a few dollars per month to almost $1,000 per month.

Though mentioned previously, it should be re-emphasized that the actual OSS amounts are calculated based on the individual’s income. The table below shows a breakdown of how the Maximum OSS is funded in a sample state that has a Maximum OSS for room and board of $1,200.

Optional State Supplement (OSS) Sample Calculations for 2017

Individual’s Monthly Income
Federal SSI Benefit* Optional State Supplement Standard** Maximum OSS for Room & Board
$300 $435 $465 = $1,200
$700 $35 $465 = $1,200
$900 $0 $300 = $1,200

*Maximum in 2017 is $735 for someone with zero income
**Simplified example excludes Personal Needs Allowance

 

2) Limiting the Amount Assisted Living Can Charge for Room & Board
Another strategy states take to help their residents afford assisted living is to cap the amount that assisted living residences can charge for room and board. As it is a free market, the state cannot simply cap pricing on all assisted living residences, but it can do so on those assisted living residences that accept Medicaid. To be clear, this strategy will only help Medicaid beneficiaries who reside in assisted living residences that accept Medicaid. It limits room and board fees (not care costs). Usually the state sets the maximum fees for room and board to be equivalent to the federal SSI benefit or the federal SSI benefit, plus the Optional State Supplement.

Simply stated, Medicaid-eligible persons who live in assisted living or adult foster care homes that accept Medicaid will receive enough financial assistance from the federal and state governments to cover their assisted living room and board fees.

 

Eligibility

Income
Each state sets its own eligibility requirements for their Optional State Supplement (if they offer one). Most states base eligibility on the candidate’s income level. If their income is at or below the federal SSI benefit rate level, then they are also eligible for the Optional State Supplement. Having said that, some states make the income cut-off higher or lower than the federal SSI level. A few states use a different scale entirely; they set the income eligibility level based on a percentage of the state median income. In 2017, to be eligible for the federal SSI benefit, individuals must have less than $735 per month in income.

Place of Residence
Though this may be somewhat obvious, to be eligible for OSS for assisted living or adult foster care room and board costs, the recipient must live in an assisted living community or adult foster care home. Many states define assisted living and adult foster care differently. State by state assisted living and adult foster care definitions are available here. Note that this is a large PDF file and is not written for a consumer audience.

 

State-by-State Guide

The information below is the best available data as of March, 2017. However, when a state provides assistance, the actual amounts may vary slightly from the numbers shown. Unlike, the federal SSI rate, OSS amounts are not adjusted annually with a Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA). Again, it should be emphasized that an individual’s actual benefit amount is calculated based on their income. Therefore, the figures in the table below are relative, not fixed amounts.

State

Optional State Supplement / State Supplementary Payments

Alabama

Does not offer financial assistance through the form of an Optional State Supplement for SSI recipients that live in assisted living. Search for other financial assistance in Alabama.

 

Alaska

Provides a supplement of approximately $100 / month for assisted living residents. While not related to Social Security, Alaska also has state-subsidized assisted living through its Pioneer Homes program.

 

Arizona

Arizona, unfortunately, does not offer an Optional State Supplement for residents regardless of their living situation. Use our Resource Locator Tool to find other financial help for aging care in AZ.

 

Arkansas

Arkansas does not offer an Optional State Supplement for residents regardless of their living situation.   However, Arkansas puts a cap on the amount that assisted living communities that accept Medicaid can charge Medicaid-eligible residents for room and board. That cap is equal to the federal SSI payment minus a personal needs allowance. Stated another way, if someone is eligible for the federal SSI benefit, that benefit will be sufficient to cover their room and board fees in assisted living. Arkansas is also home to some of the most affordable assisted living in the country.

 

California

California has a Social Security supplement for assisted living residents, which the state refers to as RCFEs or Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly. The state pays approximately $412 per month above the federal SSI payment. In California terminology, this is called the Non-Medical Out-of-Home Care Rate (NMOHC). In addition, California limits the amount assisted living residences that accept Medicaid can charge Medicaid recipients for room and board. That amount is equal to the federal SSI rate plus the CA supplement. Assisted living in CA is considerably less expensive as one moves inland, away from the coast. Pricing is available here and help finding care here.

 

Colorado

For residents of assisted living, Colorado offers a supplement to the federal SSI rate of approximately $651 per month to be put towards room and board fees.

Colorado also has an Adult Foster Care program for SSI recipients who prefer a home-like environment to assisted living.

 

Connecticut

Connecticut offers an Optional State Supplement for room and board. However, one should be careful in assuming that all communities are eligible. The state defines what people classically think of as “assisted living” differently. According to the state, “managed residential community” residents are not eligible, but those in “residential care homes” are eligible. Residential care homes include adult foster care and memory care homes for persons with Alzheimer’s / dementia. A free service is available to help find residential care homes in CT. One should inquire closely whether or not the community accepts the OSS. The dollar value of the OSS varies with the day rate of the residential care home and with the income of the beneficiary.

 

Delaware

Delaware offers a state-funded, Social Security supplement of approximately $140 per month for assisted living room and board fees to persons who are SSI eligible. Free assistance is also available to help families find assisted living within their means.

 

District of Columbia

DC offers a Social Security supplement for room and board in assisted living. The amount of the supplement varies dependent on the number of residents in the assisted living community. Supplements range from approximately $585 to $695 / month. This is high relative to most states, but DC also has some of the highest assisted living costs in the US. One might find less expensive assisted living in the surrounding area.

 

Florida

For residents of assisted living communities and adult foster care homes who are eligible for SSI, Florida provides a monthly income supplement intended for room and board fees of approximately $79.   Families might also find more affordable assisted living by moving inland from the Gulf and Atlantic coastlines.

 

Georgia

Unfortunately, Georgia does not have an Optional State Supplement for residents of assisted living or adult foster care homes.

For Georgia residents on Medicaid who live in assisted living communities that accept Medicaid, the state limits the amount the residence can charge for room and board. It is set equal to the federal SSI benefit.

One can search for other financial assistance for aging care here.

 

Hawaii

In Hawaii, there is an Optional State Supplement for SSI eligible persons in assisted living. However, the state uses multiple alternative terms to describe assisted living, including Community Care Foster Family Homes (CCFFHs) and Adult Residential Care Homes (ARCHs). The maximum amount a resident can receive is approximately $760 per month, which includes both the federal SSI benefit and the OSS. State residents might want to search for other forms of financial help for care.

 

Idaho

Idaho provides an Optional State Supplement to SSI-eligible residents who live in assisted living communities or licensed adult foster care home. The supplement is intended for room and board and ranges from approximately $320 - $455 per month. Not every assisted living community is certified to receive the OSS. One can find assisted living communities here, but be sure to inquire if they accept OSS.

 

Illinois

Illinois offers a generous Optional State Supplement of up to approximately $1,200 per month for certain limited types of “sheltered care facilities”.  However, the definition is strict, and in practice, very few persons benefit from this type of assistance. Fortunately, another option exists for low-income Illinois residents in the form of the Supportive Living Waiver.

 

Indiana

Indiana does not offer Social Security supplementation to its residents regardless of their living situation.

For Medicaid-eligible Hoosiers living in assisted living residences that accept Medicaid, the state limits how much the residence can charge the individual for room and board. The cap is set equal to the federal SSI benefit. Therefore, Medicaid recipients in assisted living have their room and board covered.

Also of note, while not Social Security related, Indiana also offers a Residential Care Assistance Program.

 

Iowa

In Iowa, there exists a Social Security supplement for persons that live in Residential Care Facilities, but not for persons in Assisted Living Programs (using Iowa legal language). The supplement is intended for room and board charges (as opposed to personal care) and is limited to approximately $300 / month.

Residential Care Facilities in Iowa are limited to persons that have an order from a doctor prescribing that level of care. Generally speaking, this is a higher level of care than is offered in assisted living, but less than a nursing home. Assistance is available to help find Residential Care Facilities. Be sure to confirm they accept the OSS.

 

Kansas

Kansas does not offer a Social Security Optional State Supplement to persons living in assisted living or adult foster care homes. Fortunately, the cost of assisted living in Kansas is at or below the national average, and free assistance is available to help families find assisted living residences that they can afford.

 

Kentucky

Kentucky offers seniors that reside in assisted living or foster care homes an optional state supplement of approximately $520 per month, which is one of the more generous states. Furthermore, state regulations require that the personal care home accept the combination of the federal SSI and the state supplement for room and board (for persons who are SSI-eligible). Help is available for families to locate assisted living or adult foster care homes that accept the OSS. However, it is strongly suggested that families confirm with the home or community directly.

 

Louisiana

Louisiana has an Optional State Social Security Supplement, but not for persons who reside in assisted living or adult foster care homes. However, the state does have a non-Social Security related program to help low-income elderly individuals, which is called the Permanent Supportive Housing Program.

 

Maine

Maine provides an Optional State Supplement of approximately $235 per month to SSI-eligible residents in assisted living. Maine defines assisted living broadly to include not just assisted living homes, but also independent living, Residential Care Facilities, and other Private Non-Medical Institutions. Free assistance is also available in the state to help families locate residences that will meet their care needs and affordability. 

 

Maryland

The Optional State Supplement in Maryland is formally referred to as the Assisted Living Subsidy. Low-income seniors can receive up to $650 per month to help pay for the cost of assisted living. However, actual subsidy amounts vary with the individual and the county in which they reside. More information.

 

Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, the Optional State Supplement is approximately $454 per month. This is intended only for the room and board portion of an assisted living community’s monthly fee. Families can get help finding assisted living homes here, but be sure to confirm the home accepts the OSS.

 

Michigan

In Michigan, a Social Security supplement is offered to SSI-eligible persons that reside in “homes for the aged” in the amount of approximately $160 - $180 per month. “Homes for the aged” include assisted living, adult foster care homes, and nursing homes. Help finding homes is available here.

For Medicaid-eligible persons, the state also sets the legal limit for monthly room and board charges in assisted living equal to the federal SSI benefit plus the Optional State Supplement. 

 

Minnesota

Minnesota offers an Optional State Supplement of approximately $250 per month to be used towards the room and board fees associated with assisted living. Assistance is also available in the state to help families find assisted living that meets their needs and affordability requirements. 

 

Mississippi

Unfortunately, Mississippi is one of several states that does not offer a Social Security state supplement for assisted living room and board fees. On the positive side, Mississippi does have some of the least expensive assisted living in the country and help is available finding residences that meet a family’s needs.

 

Missouri

Missouri offers two different levels of optional Social Security supplements depending on which type of residential care the person resides. For persons in RCFs (Residential Care Facilities), the supplement is approximately $156 per month. For persons in ALFs (Assisted Living Facilities), the monthly supplement is approximately twice that amount at $292. The main distinction between RCFs and ALFs is that RCFs residents are typically in the residence for recovery, while persons in ALFs are there for long term stays.  Assistance is available locating both ALFs and RCFs.

 

Montana

Montana offers residents a Social Security Optional State Supplement of approximately $95 per month to be used towards the cost of room and board in assisted living. Beneficiaries must be financially eligible by qualifying for the federal SSI benefit

 

Nebraska

For seniors and persons under 65 years of age who are disabled, Nebraska provides a monthly Social Security supplement of approximately $440 to help offset the cost of room and board in assisted living residences. Applicants must be eligible for the federal SSI benefit and reside in an assisted living residence, which the state defines as having at least four occupants receiving care that are not related to the owner of the property. One can search for residences here, but be sure to inquire if they accept the OSS.

 

Nevada

Nevada has a monthly Optional State Supplement to the federal SSI benefit of approximately $392. To receive the benefit, candidates must reside in a “residential facility for groups,” more commonly referred to as an assisted living home. However, Nevada limits the total number of occupants to 16 or less. One can locate homes here, but be sure to inquire about the number of residents.

 

New Hampshire

New Hampshire refers to assisted living formally as residential care facilities (RCFs). For SSI eligible, RCF residents, the state provides an additional financial supplement to the federal SSI benefit of approximately $208 each month. To search for assisted living in NH, click here.  One should inquire with each residence to confirm they accept the OSS.

 

New Jersey

New Jersey has a Social Security supplement for assisted living residents for room and board costs of approximately $210 per month. To receive this benefit, candidates must 1) Live in NJ assisted living residences that accepts OSS, and 2) Have income under the federal SSI benefit limit. To further assist Medicaid-eligible, assisted living residents, the state limits the amount assisted living residences can charge for room and board. NJ sets this amount equal to the federal SSI benefit plus the optional state supplement. Therefore, Social Security (through SSI and the Optional State Supplement) will cover the complete cost of room and board in assisted living residences in NJ for Medicaid eligible residents.

Persons ineligible for Medicaid can get assistance finding affordable assisted living in NJ here.

 

New Mexico

New Mexico does offer an Optional State Supplement for assisted living residents who are SSI-eligible.  While the amount provided is less than in many states, assisted living room and board fees in New Mexico is also less expensive than in many states. The Optional State Supplement is approximately $100 each month. For New Mexico assisted living costs, click here.

 

New York

New York has one of the more generous Optional State Supplements for assisted living residences (ALRs).  In fact, the state offers a range dependent on the type of assisted living in which one resides and where within the state they reside. The range is from approximately $230 per month to as much as $695 per month. Generally speaking, persons with higher care needs and who live in more urban areas are eligible to receive a higher level of financial assistance. Find ALRs or family care homes here.

 

North Carolina

North Carolina provides assistance from both the state and individual counties for room and board for assisted living residents and for those living in Special Care Units (SCU). SCUs are usually intended for persons with dementia or Alzheimer’s. The Social Security supplement can be as high as approximately $1,096 per month for assisted living and $1,515 for Special Care Units. To be clear, this supplement is in additional to the federal SSI benefit. In addition to its generous OSS, assistance is available in NC to help families find assisted living residences and memory (Alzheimer’s) care homes.

 

North Dakota

North Dakota does not supplement Social Security payments for room and board for assisted living residents. However, the state does limit how much an assisted living residence can charge a Medicaid-eligible resident for room and board. The cap is set very close to the federal SSI monthly payment. In other words, Medicaid eligible, assisted living residents should receive enough Social Security assistance to cover their room and board fees in assisted living. Fortunately, assisted living costs in ND are below the national average (unlike home care in ND, which is well above the average).

 

Ohio

The Optional State Supplement or Residential State Supplement, as it is called in Ohio for residents living in adult foster care or group homes, ranges from approximately $506 - $606 per month. However, these homes are limited to serving a maximum of 16 individuals. Residents can receive assistance finding these homes here. Make certain to confirm the home accepts the RSS. More info.

Additionally, for Medicaid recipients living in assisted living homes, the state caps their monthly room and board fees equal to the federal SSI benefit. Therefore, Medicaid eligible assisted living residents should receive enough Social Security assistance to pay for their room and board.

 

Oklahoma

Unfortunately, Oklahoma is among the states that do not provide additional Social Security assistance for residents of assisted living communities or other non-nursing home, group care homes. However, the cost of assisted living in OK is quite low compared to many states. 

 

Oregon

Oregon does not offer a Social Security Optional State Supplement for persons in assisted living / adult foster care situations. The state does, however, place a limit on the amount Medicaid-licensed assisted living residences can charge Medicaid-eligible residents for room and board. That cap is set just below the federal SSI benefit amount. Therefore, Medicaid eligible residents of assisted living will have their room and board costs covered. Persons ineligible for Medicaid can be connected with an advisor who will, at no charge, help them find affordable assisted living within their preferred geographic area: start here.

 

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has a Social Security supplement that ranges from approximately $435 - $440 per month based on the type of residential care. To be eligible, candidates must be SSI-eligible and living either in domiciliary care (what many people think of as adult foster care) or a personal care home (which provides support for four or more persons, but not nursing home level care).  In PA, there is also assistance to help families find “dom-care” and personal care homes. Be sure to inquire whether the residence accepts SSI & the state supplement.

 

Rhode Island

Rhode Island provides a supplement to Social Security for assisted living residents for the cost of room and board. The Optional State Supplement is approximately $332 per month. Assisted living, in RI, is defined broadly as serving two or more unrelated persons. Therefore, what many think of as adult foster care would also be eligible for this benefit. Unfortunately, the cost of assisted living in RI is on the high side.

 

South Carolina

For federal SSI-eligible persons, South Carolina has an Optional State Supplement of approximately $680 per month. This supplement is intended only for the room and board portion of the monthly charge at licensed community residential care facilities (CRCFs). CRCFs are defined broadly in South Carolina to include any type of non-nursing residential care servicing two or more persons. Therefore, classic assisted living, as well as many adult foster care homes, are included in the definition. Help is also available finding CRCFs in SC.

 

South Dakota

For SSI-eligible state residents, South Dakota supplements the federal SSI benefit up to approximately $791 per month for room and board in assisted living communities and adult foster care homes.  Furthermore, assistance is provided to help families locate these communities and homes.

For Medicaid-eligible state residents, South Dakota limits the amount an assisted living residence that accepts Medicaid can charge residents for monthly room and board. The cap is set at the federal SSI limit.  Therefore, persons who receive Medicaid benefits and live in assisted living are not eligible for the Optional State Supplement.

 

Tennessee

Tennessee does not offer an Optional State Supplement to the federal SSI benefit regardless of the location in which the individual resides. However, for Medicaid beneficiaries that participate in the CHOICES program, the state caps how much participating assisted living communities can charge Medicaid-clients for room and board. For persons not eligible for Medicaid, assistance is provided to help them locate affordable assisted living communities.

 

Texas

Texas, unfortunately, does not have an Optional State Supplement (meaning they do not supplement Social Security) for assisted living resident’s room and board costs. There may be other financial assistance available for Texans.

However, for Medicaid recipients that reside in assisted living, the state caps the amount the assisted living residence can charge for room and board. Texas sets this amount equal to the federal SSI benefit.   What this means is if a Texas Medicaid beneficiary lives in an assisted living community and they are financially eligible for SSI, then they should receive enough financial assistance to pay for their assisted living room and board.

Non-Medicaid eligible Texans can receive free assistance finding affordable assisted living communities in their preferred locations: start here.

 

Utah

Utah does not provide supplemental financial assistance (an Optional State Supplement) for its residents for assisted living room and board. However, there is free assistance available in Utah to help its residents find affordable assisted living.

 

Vermont

Vermont has a Social Security supplement (an Optional State Supplement) for persons who reside in assisted living residences and adult foster care homes. Beneficiaries who are eligible for the federal SSI benefit can receive up to approximately $225 each month to be put toward the cost of room and board in assisted living or adult foster care. Unfortunately, assisted living in VT can be expensive.

 

Virginia

The state of Virginia has an Optional Social Security supplement called an Auxiliary Grant (for assisted living or adult foster home residents). This grant helps persons who are SSI-eligible to afford the cost of non-nursing home based residential care, such as assisted living communities or adult foster family homes. The amount granted varies dependent on the income of the applicant and also based on where in Virginia they reside.  The maximum amount that can be received is approximately $685 per month in Arlington, Loudon, Prince William, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, Manassas Park counties, and the city of Alexandria. The maximum amount in the remaining counties is approximately $520 per month. More info.

 

Washington

The state of Washington does not supplement Social Security (meaning it does not offer an Optional State Supplement) for assisted living residents. However, for Medicaid beneficiaries that reside in assisted living communities that accept Medicaid, room and board rates are capped to the federal SSI limit. Non-Medicaid eligible residents can receive free assistance finding assisted living within their budget.

 

West Virginia

West Virginia does not offer an Optional State Social Security Supplement, but does have a similar program. Between approximately $900 and $1,200 per month is available to help pay for adult foster care homes or group personal care homes for persons who are eligible for SSI

 

Wisconsin

The Optional State Supplement in Wisconsin is called the SSI Exceptional Expense Supplement (SSI-E). Residents of adult foster care home, community-based residential facilities (CBRFs) or residential care apartment complexes (RCACs) (all of which are essentially assisted living) can receive up to approximately $180 per month in additional financial assistance. Help is also available here to assist residents in finding residential senior living.

 

Wyoming

Wyoming does not supplement or increase residents Social Security benefits if the resident resides in an assisted living or adult foster care home. However, Wyoming residents may be eligible for other assistance to help them afford senior living or to age in place. Search here.

 


 

 

How to Apply for Optional State Supplements

Prior to applying, it is recommended that one take the federal governments online screening for benefits located here.

The application process and administering agencies are different in each state. In some states, eligibility for Medicaid automatically determines eligibility for SSI, which in turn automatically makes one eligible for the Optional State Supplement. In other states, one must apply directly for the Optional State Supplement. Finally, for 12 states, (CA, DE, DC, HI, IA, MI, MT, NV, NJ, PA, RI, & VT), OSS is administered by the federal Social Security Administration. The table below contains the name of the administrative agency for OSS for each state. Persons interested in applying should contact these agencies.

During the application process, one should expect to provide some or all the following documents for evidence of eligibility.

  • Social Security Number
  • Proof of Age
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Living Arrangements (specifically when living in assisted living or adult foster care)
  • Proof of Citizenship
  • Work History

 

State

Optional State Supplement Administering Agency / Application Location

Alabama

County Departments of Human Resources

Alaska

Department of Health and Social Services Local Offices

Arizona

N/A

Arkansas

N/A

California

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Colorado

Department of Human Social Services County Office

Connecticut

Social Security Agency Regional Offices

Delaware

Social Security Administration

District of Columbia

Health Care Finance and Social Security Administration Offices

Florida

Department of Children and Families Offices

Georgia

No application required. Georgia automatically identifies recipients.

Hawaii

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Idaho

Department of Health and Welfare Local Office

Illinois

Department of Human Services County Office

Indiana

Division of Family Resources County Office

Iowa

Department of Human Services Local Office

Kansas

Automatically generated from Social Security and Medicaid recipients

Kentucky

Cabinet for Health and Family Services Local Office

Louisiana

Bureau of Health Services Local Office

Maine

Department of Health and Human Services Office

Maryland

County Social Services Agencies

Massachusetts

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Michigan

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Minnesota

County Welfare and Human Services Agencies

Mississippi

N/A

Missouri

Family Support Division State Office

Montana

Department of Public Health and Human Services Offices

Nebraska

Department of Health and Human Services Offices

Nevada

Social Security Administration Field Offices

New Hampshire

Division of Family Assistance Offices

New Jersey

Social Security Administration Offices

New Mexico

Department of Human Services County Office

New York

Social Security Administration Field Offices

North Carolina

County Department of Social Services Offices

North Dakota

N/A

Ohio

Passport Agencies

Oklahoma

Department of Human Services Offices

Oregon

Department of Human Services Local Offices

Pennsylvania

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Rhode Island

Social Security Administration Field Offices

South Carolina

Department of Health and Human Services County Offices

South Dakota

Department of Social Services Local Offices

Tennessee

N/A

Texas

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Utah

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Vermont

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Virginia

Social Services Local Offices

Washington

Social Security Administration Field Offices

West Virginia

N/A

Wisconsin

Social Security Administration Field Offices

Wyoming

N/A